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Saudi Arabia is speeding up the modernization of the judicial system.,Saudi Arabia has been trying to change, including increasing women’s social participation in recent years, but has been criticized by the international community as a ‘human rights underdeveloped country’ by executing felony and death penalty based on Islamic criminal law Sharia.

The BBC reported that Saudi Arabia announced the royal name of abolishing the death penalty only for minor defendants on the 26th following the ban on the sentence on the 24th (local time).,“Minors will be sentenced to less than 10 years in juvenile detention instead of death penalty,” said Awad al-Wahd, chairman of the Saudi government’s human rights committee.

Saudi Arabia can sentence a defendant who committed felony crimes, including murder, robbery, blasphemy, blasphemy, blasphemy, terrorism, civil war, sexual assault, adultery, and drug trafficking under criminal law.,According to Amnesty International, 184 people were executed in Saudi Arabia last year, the second highest number since 195 in 1995.

The Saudi Commission on Human Rights did not disclose the age standards of minors who banned executions on the same day, but the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child prohibits the death penalty and execution of those under 18 years of age.

“The announcement of the abolition of the death penalty for teenagers on this day has allowed at least six people to be saved,” the Guardian said.,Those who were minors from the Shiite sect, a minority Muslim sect, during the Arab Spring democratization movement were sentenced to death and were waiting for execution.,The United Nations and international human rights groups have been urging them to stop executions.

Saudi judicial reform appears to be led by Crown Prince Muhammad bin Salman, who effectively governs the kingdom.,The crown prince, who has expressed his willingness to modernize the conservative Muslim community of Saudi Arabia, allowed women to drive, watch football matches and enlist in 2018 and opened a commercial cinema in the capital Riyadh after 35 years.,But that same year, the reform drive overshadowed the killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Kashkji and the crackdown on dissidents.

The killing of Kashkji, who has been critical of the Saudi royal family, especially as a columnist for the Washington Post, has led to strong criticism from the international community, as the royal family was named behind the killing.,The Saudis have rushed to sentence the accused to death, but in the process, the crown prince’s closest aide suspected of being behind the killing was reportedly acquitted.

The international community points out that there are still many “unjust punishments” in Saudi Arabia, including beheading and limb-cutting. “Many human rights activists and female activists are detained,” the BBC said.,“Last week, human rights activist Abdullah al-Hamid died in prison after a stroke.” His colleagues claim he died because he was not given first aid.

Dan is a software developer with experience in designing, development, and delivery of Android apps. His key skills include knowledge of Core Java, JSON & XML Parsing. He's also a keyboardist. So, either you’ll find him at her desk busy in building mobile apps or at a composing music in his home studio. He contributes his ideas on tech at PressReels as an author. You can contact him at Danreels@gmail.com

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